For a Great Product Launch

There is no denying that there will be a lot of work put into the effort of creating a new product and then launching the product at market. Your goal as the party releasing this new product is to imprint on the mind of your potential customers the value of your new product or product line. Bringing this new product to market may also give you some insight into how you can better align your current campaign as well, structuring them to maximizing your profits and return on investment for the money you allocate. However, before you get too far ahead of yourself you need to keep in mind that you will need to do plenty of planning to make sure that the launch goes smoothly. So in the end there are only two things that can happen for your product, a boom when it’s launched or just be one among the many. The following will explain what you can do to ensure it is not the latter.

When bringing a new product to the market it is important to align yourself with and partner with a good group of people. One of the best ways to accomplish this is to communicate with the blog network that should already be in place in your niche. There are many blogs on any given subject, and most of them will be happy that you are giving them something to review and talk about.

This strategy is brilliant if pulled off properly as it will gain you lots of exposure in your niche and cost you nothing. The bloggers may even end up being you joint venture partners, allowing them to get an early look at what you will offer, and allowing you an opportunity to receive feedback and fix the product’s deficiencies. You could even request some feedback and not a review, allowing them to review the product as they wish when you launch it.

This is a great chance for the blogger as well as yourself, they will get hits for the review and you get exposure.

The second thing you should think about when launching a product is the perfect day for it. You may not have thought about this but not each day of the week will be the same for the launch of your product. An example, for a product aimed at people likely to be in full time work you will want to release the product late on a Friday or on a Saturday, this way they will be around for it. If you keep in mind your research you can get the most from your launch. Do your research on your targeted market and you will be able to pick the perfect day for a product launch.

Keep in mind, that the post launch period will be as important for the continued success of your product as the pre-launch period was. If you launch a product successfully, you will reap its benefits for a long, long time. You will see that, like everything, your product is going to ‘mature’. This will be a good time to think about altering the offer; you may want to change the packaging or distribution so that you can maintain the product’s revenue streams.

If you want your product launch to be a success, you had better be ready to spend a lot of time on it. Those methods discussed can really aid you in selling your new product and producing some awareness for it. Do not skip the critical steps just because you don’t see how they can help you now, they will be important in the long run.

Important Steps for your Web-Based Business

Even if you are a newbie, of course you know that you need a plan when it is time to market your site. What you will have to do to your site may depend on your method of marketing, so it is a good idea know what you intend to do. For example, SEO will definitely demand that you build your site with that in mind, and you do not want to backtrack and do it. But, experience is always a very good teacher, or at least it has the potential to be one. The need to have a solid plan in place before you build will be appreciated later on.

A rainbow is a daily treat somewhere on Oahu. Today it was in Lanikai.
Ocean Azure, Sky Grey

Even someone who is new to the Web can succeed with search engine optimization, but you will need to do some preparations. This is an area in which you must have a clear understanding of what is involved. The outsourcing industry is huge and thriving, and there is no shortage of SEO experts, but you have to find someone who really is an expert. But SEO is not hard at all, and you can save a lot of money by learning it. What you will need to do is put all the right on page SEO elements on your site, and after that you have to do back linking.

If you want to go for ranking in search, then knowing that could lead you to a different domain name. You never know what will give you an edge with SEO, and that is why buying a domain incorporating your keyword phrase can be valuable. What you will read about it is that the SEO score for it has been reduced but not totally eliminated. But keep in mind that you want to use the primary or main keyword phrase for your business site. When you are making your site, you know that all your pages will be optimized for their unique phrases.

For those who are not the faint of heart, PPC ads can be lucrative if you have the knowledge to pull it off. Those are PPC ads, and you can learn how to use that very effectively.

Be willing to broaden your horizons and look at other search engines besides Google. Definitely check out the competitors because they are not as unforgiving as Google, and they have a good interface in place. If you want to learn a lot, then go to the better marketing forums and ask questions.

You will need to get used to the fact that lots of decisions will need to be made as you engage in business activities. We are mainly speaking to those who are just getting going with their web business. It is clear that all of your business decisions must necessarily be based on as much factual information as possible. So try to avoid winging it if you can, and there will be times when it seems you are doing that.

The Ultimate Solution

The ultimate solution. Where web based information technology (a competitive business in itself) offers logistical software systems to a theoretically dispersed business community. Where all e-commerce functions can be 3rd party businesses including information technology. Where commercial deals are administered for established and or ad hoc merchandise enterprises.

1. Dispersed Functionality is where standard merchant functionality is broken out into separate operating units that can serve the needs of e-commerce as a single proprietary business or as a group of independent special service businesses. Most notably:

a. Deal Making (Contracting)

b. Merchandising

c. Finance

d. Marketing

e. Selling

f. Production

g. Manufacture

h. Customer Service

i. Pick&Pack

j. Shipping

k. Customer Delivery

l. Information Technology

m. Customer Management

n. Warrantee Repair Service

B. The first requirement is web connection to a totally restructured supply activity manager.

The e-tailing software we see on the market is, for the most part, designed for on-line order taking. On-line order taking and pick&pack are just two of functions that will be tied into a web based E-com Exchange. Manager.

C. There is no reason to pursue e-commerce unless you can increase sales and reduce operating costs.

Any company down the road 3 years into e-commerce will have to have made real accomplishments in operating efficiency. The magazine “Industry Standard” recently published the following projections.

The point made here is that the entire revenue and operations streams are up for change and that change will have to be well planned and look like a collaborative process. The goal will be to minimize cost and maximize service to the customer, using both house and outsourced services.
Today’s third party warehousing/distribution service providers face heavy pressure from every side. As if the usual business pressures associated with an extremely competitive, cents-on-the-dollar marketplace weren’t challenging enough, their customers are demanding ever more sophisticated value-add and logistics management services. Consequently, moving product through a warehouse is no longer good enough; moving accounting- and logistics-related information is now as critical to customer service as moving goods.

The Competitive Edge (June 17, 1999) – Microsoft Internet Explorer

 

D. E-Comizing Logistics: All Participants And The Whole Process

The outsourced pick&pack opportunity will be in its ability to perform a series of specialized roles in a highly structured and web connected collaboration of Merchant, Financier, Marketer, Customer, Manufacturer, Warehouser, Distributor, Pick&packer, Customer Servicer, Trucker and Home Deliverer.

Anyone jumping on the opportunity must realize that “productivity and cost reduction” will be the holy grail and that flexibility of response to the individual circumstances of each sale (type) will be a must.

The heart of e-commerce will be well exercised logistics based upon immediate information for and from all parties.

E. No Published Master Plan

The level of research permitted by this short study did not uncover a fully delineated master plan for multi company collaboration under e-com. Models developed prior to this past year saw a linear approach whereby companies were connected via EDI gateways in a linear fashion. The job handoff was seen as electronic, but static in nature.

F. Best Guess: Ultimate E-com Scenario

1. The e-com system talks directly to each function of the business process. Merchant, Financier, Marketer, Customer, Manufacturer, Warehouser, Distributor, Pick&Packer, Customer Servicer, Carrier and Home Deliverer. We can expect to see a few new functions and some renaming of the old.

2. .Theoretically (from the business side), each function in the retail, BtoB and wholesale process can be outsourced.

3. The spoke model returns; not as a model for a single company, but as a logistics model for the entire business community. The software acting as interlocutor for the business functions that initiate and carry out all the necessary operations.

E-com Exchange

E-Com
Collaborating
Businesses

4. One To One marketing pits the e-com system directly against the customers. Their wants and expectations, their approbations and disappointments with our services and products will be captured and become part of the e-com decision making process.

G. The Economies Of E-Com

The economies of e-com stem from everyone’s ability to better plan and respond to opportunities and problems as they occur. The pick&pack function, like all other functions, will be purchased on price and efficiency. This does not mean pricing that makes us slaves to the system. Costs are public knowledge. Profit is mandatory.

The real economies of e-com come from the savings in costly business actions not taken.

The profits of e-com are a function of the efficiency of what is done and the increased throughput of all e-com operations.


II. What Do We Do In The Mean Time?

Take a Vacation in Hawaii?

The symmetry of two islands sooths and comforts tired eyes in Kailua
My Private Islands. OK, one is for you.

 

A. Decide A Course Of Action

1. Wait And See.

2. Be Proactive

B. If We Want to be Proactive

1. Anticipate The Logistics Opportunity

2. Get Into The Business

3. Get out with the movers and shakers

4. Be part of the industry leadership and collaboration that must take place before E-com is a reality.

5. Look For Partners

a. Short Term

Instead of looking for pick&pack clients in the merchant population, teaming up with manufacturers might prove productive.
Consequently many manufacturers have outsourced warehouse and distribution functions altogether, shifting the new retailer requirements for inventory management and order processing over to third-party warehouse/distribution providers who also supply the logistics services as well.

If the manufacture have linked up with independent warehouse/distribution providers, floating pick&pack units would be plausible and more in line with the long term e-com picture.

b. Long Term

Long term partners will be those companies that also see and anticipate the logistical opportunities of e-com. These organizations will not be found on the company web page. They will be found by CEO’s, Board Chairmen, Presidents, and industry leaders working outside the company framework.

III. Synopsis

A. E-tailing

1. The term e-tailing applies to the basic merchant ability to present and sell his or her products on the web. It is the precursor to e-commerce but reflects the switch from bricks and mortar selling to electronic selling.

2. Orders are being taken on the web but fulfillment is still functioning under standard old fulfillment models

3. There is a wide variety of e-tail software. None is fully developed. From software vendor to vendor, continuity of function and design is not really apparent except for the concept of “shopping carts” and security of credit card processing..

4. Currently, the big players are making their bets on control of visitor portals to the web and to shopping.

5. Major merchants are spending big bucks being the first ones there.

6. E-tailing is showing some signs of profitability, but the big profits are down the road in full blown e-commerce.

7. The Yahoo Shopping Mall is not typical. Only a few malls take, collect and download the orders to the merchant.

8. Most Web merchants have their own E-Commerce Software and use portals and malls to take orders.

9. Gov’t regulation and taxes on e-commerce is the talk in every state legislature. Government involvement is on the way.

10. There probably is some business opportunity in offering pick&pack services to the current web merchant population, but targeting and finding suitable merchants will not be easy, and, in the long term such activity might be seen as misdirected or wasted energy.

11. E-tailing alone is not now offering a long term opportunity for 3rd party fulfillment.

B. E-Com

1. E-commerce is an industry based logistics system

2. E-com will go through at least 3 stages over 2.5 years.

3. E-com is based upon the web’s ability to be truly visitor interactive.

4. Broadband (within 4 years) is the next telecommunications breakthrough that will give the web better and faster multi media effects and make the web truly interactive.

5. Pick&Pack will continue to be an independent business opportunity, however, the context of the opportunity will change dramatically under E-com.

6. The Pick&Pack opportunity will be out there for any company able to perform fulfillment services and attach to the web. This includes traditional catalog pick&pack companies and any distribution company that wants to spin off or simply sell its e-comized pick&pack services.

7. Company differentiation will be based upon the ability to better operate each function by taking advantage of the e-com logistical software.

8. The E-Com field will continue to be entrepreneurial.

9. Ultimate E-com Software is not yet available.


E-COMMERCE OPPORTUNITY

 

PART B: Definition of The Business & The Plan

Awaiting permission to proceed

I. Preface Part B

II. The Business Definition

The Best Choice for the Future

Doing the whole e-thing may work for a while, but it is far from being the proven pick&pack answer.

If the Kiplinger report holds water, some of the old guard will end up in new partnerships. There are probably more than several active e-com courtships in progress. However, it is still early in the game. Pulling off top level business coups is one thing. Bringing off new forms of operations integration requires more discipline and time. And that is what e-commerce in its complete form is all about.

A. Is there a ready market for independent pick&pack?

1. If there is anyone out there on the web with sales in their hands and no plan for fulfillment, they are keeping it a secret. When you explore the “merchant services” pages on Yahoo, Excite, iMall or any shopping portal (small or large), fulfillment is not being addressed or offered as a service. And this is appropriate because the complete e-com model is not yet out or even designed.

B. What the pick&pack opportunity is not!

1. Not The Same Old

If in providing fulfillment services, we did not need to be price competitive; and, if we were sure to get paid in advance or in a reasonable length of time regardless of the merchant’s circumstances, we would certainly have found commercial heaven that might be called a niche. There is nothing in e-commerce that looks heavenly. We will be seriously disappointed, if we are looking to just luck out and feed upon a spontaneous appearance of web blessed products in need of pick&pack.

We cannot think that writing some e-commerce software is the secret. Electronically plugging into e-commerce is a syllogism but not a simple one.

If we think independent e-com fulfillment services will operate in the same fashion as catalog pick&pack, we, again, will be disappointed.. The are many medium to large firms already dominating this area. Experience demonstrates that small business attempts at pick&pack remain small and struggling if they survive at all. TPG has experienced and, now, appropriately avoids trying to sell pick&pack services to the direct mail catalog business.

If we think there is anything about exploiting the web that is not being thought about by someone, somewhere, we are sure to be very disappointed. This is the most public commercial endeavor in history.

If we are looking to avoid the issues of changing who we are and how we operate and if we think that waiting for the big guys who have the money and resources to write the new e-tailing script and give us a part, we will be taking the hindmost.

If we think that our pick&pack service business can survive on its own, even if our client merchants fail or find only marginal success, we are wrong.

C. What are the answers we need?

1. What will e-commerce look like in 3 years?

2. What would be our e-com services profile?

3. What would our margins be?

4. How would we integrate with merchants and other 3rd parties?

5. What would be the ideal merchant profile?

6. What products could be best handled?

7. What would be our investment model?

8. How would our enterprise be marketed?

9. What would make for differentiation?

10. Who would be the competition?

11. How would we find our strategic partners?

12. What would be done with existing resources?

a. Telemarketing?

b. Direct Mail Marketing

c. Customer Service

d. Warehouse Space & Svcs.

e. Etc.

13. How do we make transition from where we are now.?

II. Outlining An E-Commerce Model

A. Special Notes

Several things became very obvious in the course of researching this study. There is a lot of talk and speculation. There is a great deal of moving and shaking. The finer details of e-commerce have not been completely thought out. Many issues are still up in the air and terminology is not consistent.

For purposes of this paper, I have made the following distinctions:

1. E-commerce is used in a broad sense. E-commerce is a new system in which all parties are collaborators and have specific roles in getting the customers what they want. It refers to the larger process of buying, selling and managing the enterprise operations via the web. If we are looking for an e-com prototype, the stock exchanges are a good place to start. The exceptions to the stock exchange model arise upon introduction of the physical nature of e-com products There are 3 manifestations of e-commerce that require some recognition. They are:

a. E-commerce Seeking Definition (Now)

Whatever we see happening now including e-tailing..

b. Proprietary E-commerce

First attempts at owning the whole ball of wax.

c. The E-com System

 

Projected Web Sales

Given projected web sales of $990 billion in the near term and as much as $2 trillion in a few years, there is little doubt in the minds of movers and shakers that e-tailing (distinct from retailing) is the place to be.

A. What must we bone up on relative to e-tail, the internet and the web?

1. One to One (1:1) Marketing is the catch phrase that describes the new web driven relationship between merchant and customer. Interactive business opens up a new set of marketing and customer involvement factors that dramatically affect the pick&pack opportunity. (See Enterprise One To One   by Peppers and Rogers, Doubleday/Currency 1997)

2. Technology: The PC and WebTV provide the human interface. The web provides each web site and site visitor with unique, international identity. The web browser provides the ability to view and exchange web pages, email and multi media effects. The internet provides global connectivity via phone lines and satellite communications.

3. Bandwidth technology will provide relief from current limitations on the speed and quality of what can be communicated between web sites and web visitor PC’s. When broad band communications becomes available to the web visitor, e-com marketing will take on a new and more exciting face that is expected to drive home the really big e-com sales hit.

4. The foreground players are the web site owners and the web site visitors who are determined to communicate.

5. The background players are the movers and shakers (hi-technology and money people) and the existing infrastructure operators who are driven, for their own reasons, to keep the whole thing going.

6. The roles we are concerned with are visitor, manufacturer, merchant, marketer, order filler, customer service rep, shipper and customer

7. Action Areas  such as portals, 1 to 1 marketing, new e-com software, internet access via broader bandwidth, e-tailing and
e-BTB (business to business.)

B. What do the leading portals, search engines & on-line malls tell us?

 

Putting up a page and offering something for sale is the easiest e-com thing to do. Getting the page noticed and getting visitors to buy are more difficult. Being one site among millions of sites requires a certain amount of differentiation. Differentiation begins at the moment a web visitor logs on to the web. The term “portal” has come about to express the value of being one of the first places a visitor stops when coming on-line. The original Compuserve, AOL and Prodigy were portals whether they knew it or not. The visitor came there for the personal services (bulletin boards, forums etc) and stayed. Web browsers also had a portal quality and then search engines became the first place to go when surfing or searching the net.

The point is that there is great movement to get control of the limited number of first level (entry level) portals to the web in general and to web shopping in particular.

 

The original idea of the portal was that it would be a site to pass through on the way to one’s real destination. But the “pass through” portal soon gave way to the “sticky portal”. The idea being to hold on to the visitor for as long as possible and if you let the visitor pass through to another site, make sure she and he can find their ways back. First level portals, by all practicality, must be heavily visited sites. Providing chat rooms, cyber communities, free email, free personal web pages and access to news services etc. are considered the keys to gaining and keeping a main portal status.

 

Portal status provides the basis for web advertising. Millions of people passing through a portal cannot help but see the banners and other ads flashing in the borders of their PC screens. If billboards on highways can produce customers, portal advertising could only be a refinement.

 

The movers and shakers are constantly coming up against the power of internet egalitarianism. Having things your own way is accepted by the main portals and encouraged via the well advertised ability to “personalize” you portal page. Every time you sign on, your personal portal page is waiting with your specific requirements for news, weather, horoscope, stock prices etc.and hopefully with you shopping profile for merchants to feed upon.

 

Search engines exist all over the web for very general and very specific purposes. The best known and most used search engines are Yahoo, Excite, Infoseek (now GoTo), Altavista, Snap etc. Though the keyword search engine continues to be the biggest show in town, most operators have also added hand compiled directories to specific products, services and information.

 

You would think that these “directories” would attempt to get the visitors more quickly to the end of their searches. This, however, is only partially true.(see gauntlets & advertising below) Directories vary from operator to operator, but, taxonomy of directory categories, sub categories, sub-sub categories and related site pages is becoming somewhat uniform. Of these directories, the “Shopping Directory” usually stands well out on the portal entry page (personalized or not).

 

C. What do online malls and catalogs offer?

1. An on-line mall is a shopping portal with direct link access to both large and small e-tail merchants. A mall usually presents it merchants to the public via a combined shopping search engine and shopping directory. Unlike the big portals, the search engines and directories are usually exclusive to the mall.

2. The Visitor Search Gauntlet. In all cases, the mall visitor must find his or her own way .The mall search engine gives the visitor a box in which to enter a merchant name, product category, product name and, in some cases, a related keyword. The search process takes the visitor through at least 3 distinct pages that narrow down the search but also allow for 3 presentations of paid advertising.
A “directory” is a list of shopping categories. Click a top page category name and the directory will come back with a sub category page and, in some cases, a sub-sub category page, before it presents a page of appropriate merchants to click upon. Malls will also present the option of viewing a complete list of all merchants on the mall along with a short shop description.

3. Advertising. The visitor search gauntlet is the mall’s opportunity for advertising. Each web page traversed by visitors on the way to shopping is populated by the advertising of mall and non mall merchants or service providers. If a shoppers goes through 3 mall pages before getting to a shop of choice, they will have passed by anywhere from 3 to 20 ads. The ad spaces change content throughout the day. Ad space charges are based upon whether the ad is on the 1st, 2nd,3rd, etc. page passed through by a shopper. Each directory category page provides advertising opportunity. The mall, like any magazine, can offer 100’s of choice and not so choice on-line spaces in which to advertise. Unlike, the printed magazine, however, the on-line advertising is scheduled to automatically change sponsors throughout the day. Portal operators see queuing up the e-advertisers for each page ad space as pure gold.

4. On-line Shopping Malls are sprouting up all over and they vary in how they serve the merchant and the customer. Yahoo is a major portal that operates its own shopping mall. Mall operators such as Yahoo make being a mall merchant quite easy. Yahoo, for a reasonable price, will:

q  Help design and host the merchants’ pages.

q  Arrange for on-line advertising.

q  Supply order taking software (shopping cart)

q  Process the credit card

q  Electronically supply the merchant sales orders.

q  Supply order analysis reports

5. Each merchant must have some way to accept and process orders. The many forms of e-tail software, however are not uniform or fully developed. Most malls let the merchant site supply its own e-tail software. This means that for an outside fulfillment service, to pickup sales orders electronically is generally not as simple as the Yahoo model might suggest.

6. Direct mail catalogers are finding a natural course to the web. Using their existing snail mail materials to advertise their web sites, a visitor finding them in the ever-growing web world is easy. Some catalogues are found on shopping malls. Catalogs like Eddie Bauer also use banner advertising to good advantage. Lower costs of order entry are said to be significant. Their current fulfillment methods suffice and shipping methods remain unchanged for the time being. Some believe every catalog will have to go on-line in order to survive the next 3 years.

D. Catalog Merchants And Store Merchants

1. Are advertising their e-com offering both on and off the web. Local merchants have the hardest time and can have a very disappointing e-commerce experience until they realize that the web is primarily just another order taking location You build an e-tail site over time and do not only depend upon portal links for all your sales.

2. Merchants may provide the web shopper with a complete list of all their goods for purchase or they may promote only lead items.

3. Currently, most take their own orders, process their own credit cards and fulfill via their own operations.

E. Visitors, Merchants & The Web

1. The web is a communications device, just coming into its own. There is a large and growing populace of web visitors and web sites. Both merchants and visitors are just now getting use to the idea of buying and selling on the web. The mental continuity necessary for the public’s jump from old biz to web biz is just now materializing. However, all the necessary business mechanisms have not yet been invented

2. Books, recorded music, computer software & hardware, drugs and groceries are the first product hopefuls on the web, but as vendor costs demonstrate, they have not yet been thoroughly reengineered for e-com profitability. The Amazon’s of the web are using ipo money to secure a high level shopping position. Most of the big players are not expecting short term profits but longer term marketing recognition as top portals.

3. Other industries are finding some sales success, especially those that are not picking and packing a physical product. Travel and investment are web active. Web banking is coming out and many on-line news services see insurance companies hurrying to catch up.

4. News services are popular. Magazines are doing especially imaginative marketing. Newspapers have well developed sites, but the full switch to e-com is not evident.

F. Visitor Statistics

Article #2: Visitor Stats

Books

Amazon.com 9,497,000

Bn.com 3,954,000

Borders.com 441,000

Booksonline.com 292,000

QPB.com 251,000

Amazon.com is closing in on the 10-million mark-while Borders.com (with 9 million fewer visitors than Amazon) is running a very distant third.

 

Greeting Cards

Bluemountainarts.com 11,507,000

Egreetings.com 1,656,000

123greetings.com 1,576,000

Hallmarkconnections.com 696,000

Hallmark.com 690,000

Americangreetings.com 495,000

3Dgreetings.com 317,000

Nicecards.com 276,000

Greeting-cards.com 256,000

E-cards.com 250,000

Bluemountainart.com is king of the mountain, with the most visitors of any retail site tracked by Media Metrix. Real-world rivals Hallmark and American Greetings are playing catch-up.

 

Drugstores

Drugstore.com 562,000

Mothernature.com 277,000

PlanetRx.com 235,000

Vitaminshoppe.com 224,000

Healthshop.com 215,000

New kid on the block drugstore.com jumps to the front of this emerging category (having Amazon.com as an investor doesn’t hurt, either).

 

Flowers

1800flowers.com 390,000

Virtualflorest.com 381,000

Ftd.com 304,000

PCflowers.com 259,000

Virtualflowers.com 234,000

It’s a virtual run for the roses in this category. The virtual leaders (1800flowers.com and Virtualflorist.com) have a slight edge over ftd.com, but it’s a growing market.

 

Music/Movies

CDnow.com 2,348,000

BMGmusicservice.com 2,314,000

Columbiahouse.com 2,131,000

Musicblvd.com 1,783,000

Buy.com 1,410,000

Reel.com 785,000

Bigstar.com 725,000

The pre-merger CDnow/Music Boulevard tandem drew 4.1 million visitors, only slightly less than the two biggest mail-order music clubs, BMG and Columbia House, attracted online combined.

 

Computers/Software

Beyond.com 2,141,000

Egghead.com 2,003,000

Dell.com 1,795,000

Warehouse.com 658,000

Outpost.com 545,000

PCconnection.com 288,000

Computersbynet.com 224,000

Zones.com 222,000

With its offbeat TV campaign, Beyond.com edges out Egghead.com for bragging rights, with Dell.com not far behind.

 

Unique visitors are the actual number of total users who visited the Web site once in the given month. All unique visitors are unduplicated (counted only once).

 

Source: Media Metrix. Lists were categorized by Internet Retailer and do not necessarily represent all sites in a given category. All figures are for April 1999. Visitor projections are based on a sampling of more than 40,000 individuals throughout the United States.

Copyright © 1999. This content is the property of Faulkner & Gray.

http://www.internetretailer.com/html/stats/stats.htm

 

 

G. Web Visitors As “Lookers and Bookers”

1. Every visitor click is not a sale. The majority of people “look”. More and more people are “booking their orders online”. However, all the tricks of on-line merchandising have not yet been learned and the art of making a sale is still in its infancy.

H. What is the traditional pick&pack community is doing?

A review of the traditional pick&pack companies shows interest but no landslide of activity on the web. They all have web sites, but other than discussing EDI and saying e-commerce is important, most do not appear poised for on-line action; at least according to their current web sites.

One vendor has decided to create its own e-mall and provide all relevant site services (hosting, e-com software etc) as well as fulfillment services. Arnold Logistics presents its program as follows:

Our e-business Philosophy

e-business is much more than just simply placing a web page on the Internet and taking an order. At UDS, it is a philosophy of giving a complete solution to both our Clients and their customers by making the entire electronic shopping experience “seamless”.

 

We host and develop the web site. We charge the credit cards and process the orders. We pick pack and ship the orders. We accept the returns and issue the refunds. Through this entire process we are providing customer service and customer communication.

 

Our Client’s benefit from our complete solution by getting satisfied customers, single point of contact, and a complete on-line reporting solution of entire process

Arnold Logistics Web Site ARLO.com

The Pick and Pack Idea

A Short E-Commerce Study For The Thompson Publishing Group

E-COMMERCE AND THE PICK&PACK OPPORTUNITY

I. Preface

The Study

Most off-line businesses are looking for their on-line business opportunity. Less than a year ago, web pundits suggested caution when pursuing web retailing. In the last several months companies have jumped at web opportunities as if they were running in fear that their business niche, real or imagined, would disappear as e-commerce becomes the main venue for sellers meeting buyers.

This two-part study is prompted by the enormous amount of public attention being given to the current birth pains of e-commerce on the web. Specifically, we want to know:

 

–  Is there a new opportunity in e-commerce for independent pick&pack services?

–  How is the web/e-commerce opportunity structured for our profitability?

 

Two items of note begin the research.   First, a look at the much publicized Yahoo Shopping Mall, its portal competitors and the merchants now appearing on the web. Second a look at the e-com spin in the news epitomized by the July 2, 1999 Kiplinger Washington Letter which stated:
Lots of venture capital out there” Distribution firms are the latest darlings……They see a huge demand for firms that can pack, track and deliver goods sold over the internet, especially as web shopping begins to take off.”

 

This short study/synopsis is the first of three project parts. Limited to ten days, the bulk of the research was on-line; visiting more than 120 web sights and reviewing the same number of news articles. The research focus was on web portal operators, shopping malls, the competing pick&pack community and views expressed in on-line newsletters and magazines. Several books and paper publications were also helpful.

For the sake of brevity, the actual articles and other web materials are not included in the document. The are included as MS Word rich text files on the accompanying zip drive. These rich text documents also act as a general bibliography for the study.

Part A is directed toward uncovering and explaining the role of pick&pack in the setting of e-tailing and e-commerce. Part B will be pursued after the results of Part A have been reviewed by management and will be directed toward defining and building an appropriate business plan. Part C, if commercially appropriate would implement a business plan.

II. Table Of Contents

I. Preface…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 2

II. Table Of Contents…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 2

I. The Study Questions………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 2

A. What are the latest sales projections for e-tailing?………………………………………………………………………………. 2

B. What must we bone up on relative to e-tail, the internet and the web?………………………………………………. 2

C. What do the leading portals, search engines & on-line malls tell us?…………………………………………………… 2

D. What do online malls and catalogs offer?…………………………………………………………………………………………… 2

E. Catalog Merchants And Store Merchants…………………………………………………………………………………………… 2

F. Visitors, Merchants & The Web…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 2

G. Visitor Statistics…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 2

H. Web Visitors As “Lookers and Bookers”…………………………………………………………………………………………….. 2

I. What is the traditional pick&pack community is doing?……………………………………………………………………… 2

J. Is there a ready market for independent pick&pack?………………………………………………………………………….. 2

K. What the pick&pack opportunity is not!…………………………………………………………………………………………….. 2

L. What are the answers we need?…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 2

II. Outlining An E-Commerce Model…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 2

A. Special Notes……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 2

B. The first requirement is web connection to a totally restructured supply activity manager………………… 2

C. There is no reason to pursue e-commerce unless you can increase sales and reduce operating costs… 2

D. E-Comizing Logistics: All Participants And The Whole Process………………………………………………………….. 2

E. No Published Master Plan……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 2

F. Best Guess: Ultimate E-com Scenario…………………………………………………………………………………………………. 2

G. The Economies Of E-Com………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 2

III. What Do We Do In The Mean Time?……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 2

A. Decide A Course Of Action…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 2

B. If We Want to be Proactive…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 2

IV. Synopsis…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 2

A. E-tailing……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 2

B. E-Com…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 2

I. Preface Part B…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 2

II. The Business Definition………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 2

III. The Business Plan………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 2

 

 

Professional Directories

We call ourselves “Identity & Dialogue Experts”

We have created a business profiling system that incorporates two key types of information into your web based business presence. The Business Identity Profile is information that defines what your organization is, does and how it is unique. At the same time, it sends the industrial, trade and market signals that are calculated to attract the people and organizations that are looking for your products and services. The Visitor Dialogue Profile is a table of contents for the information that your company wants to put, selectively, into the hands of real and potential customers, strategic partners, suppliers and the general public.

 

1. Your Business Identity Profile

Your Business Identity Profile consists of 1 or more Sector Directory Templates. Each designed to add indexed data to your presence on the web. Directory templates are a dynamic function of the system. They are versatile and immediately afford new channels of indexed identity. The increase in search engine (multi-indexed) capability should be obvious. However, templates have an even larger roll to play as web based business becomes more common and a company’s web visibility and credibility become crucial to transacting business.

2. Your Visitor Dialogue Profile

Your organizations ongoing dialogue with the consumer and business communities goes on 24 hours each day and can stretch across the world. It should be well managed. Those people in charge of sales, marketing and public relations should be apprised of what the company’s community web dialogue is doing and can do. The substance of that dialogue is data, documents and multi media communications. Your Visitor Dialogue Profile is your web site Table Of Contents for all the communications you want to make available and the conditions under which they may be published

3. Your Visitor Dialogue Repository

The actual dialogue communications data and files are kept on the company’s site in either the Sector supplied Dialogue Repository or in the company’s own network data bases and servers. In either case, all content is cataloged, located and ready for viewing, printing or download on demand.

4. Web Sector Business Profile Activation: Software

You do not have to do everything at once. Start small. You can easily enhance your profile as you see it work for you

a. Online and easy,

b. Compose Your Business Identity Profile

(1)     Select your directory templates
(2)     Enter the requested business information

c. Compose Your Visitor Dialogue Profile

(1)     Define Your Table Of Contents
(a)   Select your contents templates
(b)   Enter the requested set up information
(2)     Enter Your Business Data
(a)   Select Your templates
(b)   Enter the requested data
(3)     Label & Link your Documents & Multi Media Files
(a)   Load all files into an accessible directory
(b)   Select Templates
(c)    Enter the requested data

d. Do a site test installation

(1)     Test/Print and verify your profile contents
(2)     Test/Print your dialogue data
(3)     Test/Print/Run your multi-media files
(4)     Make Changes
(5)     Get proper company authorization to activate.

e. Activate Your Site and First Profiles

(1)     Loads the Hidden Web Sector Pages
(a)   Subscriber Page
(b)   Identity Templates Page(s)
(2)     Activates the Respository
(3)     Loads the latest Client Site Version of the Web Sector-Tellit Software & Uniform Access Pages.
(a)   Visitor’s Info Teller:

1]     Table Of Contents Page

2]     Display & Retrieval Page

3]     Sector Search Engine Page (if wanted by client)

4]     Client’s Associations, Affiliations, Credentials And 3rd Party Information Sources & Information Links

(4)     Sends a copy of the identity profile and subscription requirements to the Web Sector Inc Directory Server

f. Web Sector Directory Server Automatically Responds

(1)     Updates the client selected directory indexes
(2)     Notifies the client via email of the .Sector Search Engines accessibility to their new or updated client identity profile
(3)     Notifies the outside directory sponsor(s) (if any) of the new directory memberships
(4)     Notifies the authorized client personal to initiate a Web Sector profiling maintenance session for authorization & download of directory and free service links.
(5)     Posts & schedules any special services requested by the client on the subscription page.

                                                                II. NO LONGER ADRIFT IN THE WORLD WIDE WEB

A. You are safe in the WWW Business Sector

You are still on the web. Being in the Web Business Sector simply means you are easily identified, easily differentiated, easily searched for and easily found. And depending upon the number of independent directory templates you have selected, you have opened up new relationship channels that give you more visibility while providing more places to present and publish your company’s current marketing and PR story.

B. Your Business Sector Search Engine

People do not need to go through a thousand key word search results in order to find your web site. If they know your name our new search engine will speed them to your site. If they do not know you yet, they can describe what they are looking for using multiple criteria and, again, be sped to you site.

1. Your New Business Sector Identity

a. You can now be found by

(1)     Your Legal Business Name
(2)     Your DBA Business Name
(3)     Your Company Name Acronym
(4)     Your Trade Names
(5)     Your Traditional Business Categories
(6)     Your Corporate Offices Address
(a)   Street
(b)   City
(c)    State/Prov/Parish
(d)   Nation
(e)    Postal Code
(7)     Your C?O’s Names
(8)     Your Phone #’s
(9)     Your email address
(10)And As Usual Your Domain Name

b. You can also be found via any House Directories for which you have activated a template in your identity profile.

(1)     House Trading Names Directory
(2)     House Legal Names Directory
(3)     WWWBS Operating Characteristics
(a)   Company Name

1]     Company Business Name

a]     Broad Business Category

i-              Industrial

ii-             Financial

iii-            Commercial

b]     Broad Business Function

i-              Manufacturing

ii-             Processing

iii-            Assembling

iv-            Distributing

v-             Selling Wholesale

vi-            Selling Retail

vii-           Leasing/Renting

viii-          Providing Services

c]     Broad Product Categories

i-              Public Recognized

ii-             Trade/Industry Recognized

iii-            WWWBS Y2K Recognized

d]     Broad Service Categories

i-              Public Recognized

ii-             Trade/Industry Recognized

iii-            WWWBS Y2K Recognized

c. You can also be found via the special Independent Directories for which you have activated a template in your identity profile.

(1)     Industry Org. Directories
(2)     Trade Org. Directories
(3)     Professional Directories
(4)     Portal Directories
(5)     Credit Directories
(6)     Rating Directories
(7)     Trade Publication Directories
(8)     Association Directories
(9)     Special Issues & Causes Directories

Professional Directories

Coherent Business Talk

WEB SECTOR INC.

WEB IDENTITY & DIALOGUE SERVICES

Answering Four Questions:

1. Who are we?

2. How are we different?

3. What can we do for clients?

4. How do we do business?

PROFILING, INDEXING, SEARCHING AND PUBLISHING
YOUR PUBLIC RELATIONS AND MARKETING MESSAGES

IN THE WORLD WIDE WEB BUSINESS SECTOR

WEB SECTOR

THE REAL IDENTITY ADVANTAGE
I. WWWBS: THE WEB GREW A NEW DIMENSION LAST NIGHT

Last night, Web Sector Inc. announced a “real place” for “real businesses” on the World Wide Web. There’s nothing virtual about it. It’s not for surfing, its for working. Its not for casual searching, its for finding. Its not for chatting, its for straight, coherent business talk. Its not for banners and blinking ads, it for presenting your whole business identity along with the public relations and marketing messages that keep you in business and competitive. Most important, it is not just for malls and e-tailers. It is for every active business in the world that wishes to stand up and be counted as “in” and “ready for” business.

It does not eliminate the techie web, the fun web, the personal web, the shopping web or the virtually anything web experience. It simply makes the active business world more visible, more organized, more coherent, more accountable and totally distinguishable from everything else on the web. Something the non business communities feel they can do without. In fact, the non-business types appear to welcome the distancing of the business mentality to different quarters, even though it is just a sector away.

Dubbed the World Wide Web Business Sector (WWWBS), it adds a new and practical web dimension for pure business activity that was not there before. It makes opportunity clearer and major collaboration practical.

The Business Sector is not a home page, not a portal, not an AOL look-alike or some other proprietary landscape. It emanates from your business web site. It is your thoroughly defined business identity. It is your up to the minute PR and Marketing dialogue (messages) preceding your business 24 hours per day across the world on the WWWBS. It is a place for new and extremely efficient commercial relationships and opportunities.

 

                                                                                         II. WHAT YOUR BUSINESS NEEDS TO DO!

A. WHO ARE YOU

You own and or manage any business. It doesn’t matter if the business is large, medium or small, but it does matter that your company is actively in business and expects to be in business for the foreseeable future. You, personally, should have an appreciation if not responsibility for some level of marketing be concerned about public relations and, to some extant, customer service.

 

B. YOU WILL NEED A WEB SITE

If you have one, you will not have to change it, but you will measurably enhance it. If you have not got a web site, consider getting one. You may not have needed one before, but, now you do.

C. YOU WILL NEED TO GATHER ALL THE INFORMATION YOUR ORGANIZATION NEEDS TO BUILD AN APPROPRIATE AND RELATIVELY POWERFUL WEB BUSINESS PRESENCE.

Do not be intimidated by the word “all”. In this case, we mean all the information you need to do the job you want to do. But, be assured, as needs increase and the demands for information change, you will be working within an rugged profiling structure that can accommodate each new and often unique facet of your business. All of the following items will play a part in your business profile sooner or later, if your business is positioning itself properly for growth.

1. Your companies, your partnerships, your businesses, your market segments, your trade names.

2. Your locations, mail & shipping addresses, geo positions for in-house operations, sales and corporate affairs.

3. Your partnerships (strategic & otherwise), holdings, parent company and other affiliations.

4. Your products and your services

5. Your old product and service categories, key words and methods of indexing and organization.

6. Your company’s, experts, expertise and unique qualities & accomplishments

7. Your past/current/planned business promotions and product announcements

8. Your appearances in the news of the day

9. Your company’s white papers and position papers, press releases, published articles and appearances in the news.

10. The Trade Organizations, Trade Magazines, Professional Reference News Letters, Trade Books and Web Portals with which you are aligned

11. The industrial, charitable, civic and social events in which your business participates.

12. Your credibility as avowed and presented by reputable outside rating and review persons and organizations

13. Your surveyed responses to business and public issues.

14. Your business statements about how you do business, general terms, and conditions of service.

15. An whatever else makes you significant to a lone client, collaborator or entire market segment.

D. THEN YOU WILL NEED:

1. TO PREPARE YOUR COMPANY PEOPLE FOR KEEPING THE BUSINESS PROFILE ALIVE AND POTENT

Every business does not need, or should it want, an inflated WWWBS profile You will need to assure yourself that the information you present to the world is clear, complete and up-to-date. Never steer a customer wrong. Never say you have something you have not got. Never give out stale or obviously dated information

Know it now, that, depending upon what you want from your efforts, good Sector profiling can take anywhere from 20 minutes to 20 days per year to compose and less than 30 seconds to activate.

2. TO DECIDE YOUR LEVEL OF COMMITMENT TO PROFILE CONTENT AND ACCURACY

. Your Sector profile cannot be more than the company can afford to support with time and intelligent attention. Creating and registering a profile is inexpensive and easily done. The work of keeping the message fresh and active is the biggest concern. In a pinch, there are economic, outside services that will do the job for you.

E. AS YOUR COMPANY BECOMES ACCOMPLISHED IN BUSINESS PROFILING YOU WILL LOOK TO HAVE CERTAIN CAPABILITIES:

1. TO PUT MORE THAN ONE FACE ON YOUR PROFILE

Your business profile has to appeal to more than one type of person or company. You may have one company with five distinct businesses. In any case, as your company grows and expands it use of the web, it will need a flexible profile infrastructure that can simply handle complex business identities.You may start out with single business identity, but you must be able to add new special identities without compromising old ones.

2. TO CHANGE YOUR PROFILE ON THE FLY

You must be able to meet public relations and marketing situations head on.. You do not have time to wait. Your business profile must respond to broad or narrow marketing changes by end of day if not immediately..

3. TO OPEN NEW PROFILE ACCESS CHANNELS

It is a two way street, you must find your market and your market must be able to find you. You will need a ready supply of new communications channels to the people and the companies you have and want as customers, partners and resources.

4. TO DELIVER RICH MESSAGE CONTENT

The web can deliver rich multi media materials. You will need the ability to easily deliver text, video, sound, graphics and data as each situation requires.

5. TO DELIVER UNIFORM CONTENT

There is certain information that requires uniform presentation. Whether the uniformity is industry wide or world wide, it requires acceptable standards for identity, content, format, publication, accessibility and security as well as for the circumstances under which and standards are turned on and off.

6. TO DELIVER INFORMATION SELECTIVELY

Compound Directory System

                                                                                                                              I. SPECIAL DETAILS

A. The Compound Directory System

Web Sector Directories serve many functions from simple categorization of businesses to identification of business relationships and the collection of cross industry information. Each directory is identified, defined and published to the it respective business communities. Each directory has a life of its own and demands specific information care by its membership.

Directory Memberships can be developed outside of Web Sector or by our in-house indexing staff. Each directory is sponsored a special interest group, organization or indexing objective. Members elect to join most directories. Some House sponsored generic directories are mandatory for profile activation.

Each directory elected by a Web Sector client offers index keys and opens relationship channels that bring clients and special business sectors together for short or long periods of time. Such directories also provide addition insight into the over WWWBS data base and give Sector Search engine users new and varied search criteria.

1. Directory Sponsorship

a. House

b. House Industry Forum

c. Independent

(1)     Public
(2)     Private

2. Directory Content Description & Restrictions

a. Template ID

(1)     ID #
(2)     NAME
(3)     DESCRIPTION

b. Client Maintenance Commitment
And Accuracy Guarantee

(1)     TIER 0
(2)     TIER 1
(3)     TIER 2
(4)     TIER 3
(5)     TIER 4
(6)     TIER 5

c. Template Data Collection

(1)     TEMPLATE DATA ITEMS
(a)   NAME
(b)   SERIAL #
(c)    DESCRIPTION
(d)   STATEMENT CRITERIA
(e)    INDEX DESIGNATION

d. Publishable Member Identities

(1)     ACTUAL
(2)     RANDOM ID
(3)     NONE
(4)     ENCRYPTED
(5)     PSEUDONYM

e. Accessible By

(1)     MEMBERS ONLY
(2)     ANYONE
(3)     SPECIFIC IDENTITIES
(a)   DIRECTORY SPECIFIC
(b)   INFO QUALITY TIER

f. Term

(1)     OPEN DATE
(2)     CLOSE DATE
(3)     REPORT DATE
(4)     REOPEN DATE

g. PURPOSE

(1)     REPORT
(a)   SURVEY
(b)   TREND
(c)    STATUS
(2)     ORGANIZATION
(3)     CATEGORY
(4)     EVENT
(5)     AWARD
(6)     CURRENT ISSUE
(7)     CURRENT ACRONYM

h. You can also be found via any House Directories for which you have activated a template in your identity profile.

(1)     House Trading Names Directory
(2)     House Legal Names Directory
(3)     WWWBS Operating Characteristics
(a)   Company Name

1]     Company Business Name

a]     Broad Business Category

i-              Industrial

ii-             Financial

iii-            Commercial

b]     Broad Business Function

i-              Manufacturing

ii-             Processing

iii-            Assembling

iv-            Distributing

v-             Selling Wholesale

vi-            Selling Retail

vii-           Leasing/Renting

viii-          Providing Services

c]     Broad Product Categories

i-              Public Recognized

ii-             Trade/Industry Recognized

iii-            WWWBS Y2K Recognized

d]     Broad Service Categories

i-              Public Recognized

ii-             Trade/Industry Recognized

iii-            WWWBS Y2K Recognized

i. You can also be found via the special Independent Directories for which you have activated a template in your identity profile.

(1)     Industry Org. Directories
(2)     Trade Org. Directories
(3)     Professional Directories
(4)     Portal Directories
(5)     Credit Directories
(6)     Rating Directories
(7)     Trade Publication Directories
(8)     Association Directories
(9)     Special Issues & Causes Directories
(10)Professional Directories

j. =========== Three Visitor Scenario’s

(1)     The Person Who Is Hurried & Knows What She Or He Wants

For this scenario we have prepared a special page design that gets the visitors in, serviced, out and happy. We have surveyed the people who work the web on a daily basis. They are most often the serious client, potential client or the personal interface to someone who is. They need speed, familiar ways to do things, coherent results and the option to browse around if they have time.

(2)     The Person With Time To Kill

For this scenario we have the color, graphics and content of your regular web site pages and the option to move to your regular home page at the push of a “see the whole site” button.

(3)     The Person In Between

Simple and obvious navigation is implicit

 

Business Profile Activation

 I. Web Sector Business Profile Activation: Software

You do not have to do everything at once. Start small. You can easily enhance your profile as you see it work for you

A. Online and easy,

B. Compose Your Business Identity Profile

1. Select your directory templates

2. Enter the requested business information

C. Compose Your Visitor Dialogue Profile

1. Define Your Table Of Contents

a. Select your contents templates

b. Enter the requested set up information

2. Enter Your Business Data

a. Select Your templates

b. Enter the requested data

3. Label & Link your Documents & Multi Media Files

a. Load all files into an accessible directory

b. Select Templates

c. Enter the requested data

D. Do a site test installation

1. Test/Print and verify your profile contents

2. Test/Print your dialogue data

3. Test/Print/Run your multimedia files

4. Make Changes

5. Get proper company authorization to activate.

E. Activate Your Site and First Profiles

1. Loads the Hidden Web Sector Pages

a. Subscriber Page

b. Identity Templates Page(s)

2. Activates the Respository

3. Loads the latest Client Site Version of the Web Sector-Tellit Software & Uniform Access Pages.

a. Visitor’s Info Teller:

(1)     Table Of Contents Page
(2)     Display & Retrieval Page
(3)     Sector Search Engine Page (if wanted by client)
(4)     Client’s Associations, Affiliations, Credentials And 3rd Party Information Sources & Information Links

4. Sends a copy of the identity profile and subscription requirements to the Web Sector Inc Directory Server

F. Web Sector Directory Server Automatically Responds

1. Updates the client selected directory indexes

2. Notifies the client via email of the .Sector Search Engines accessibility to their new or updated client identity profile

3. Notifies the outside directory sponsor(s) (if any) of the new directory memberships

4. Notifies the authorized client personal to initiate a Web Sector profiling maintenance session for authorization & download of directory and free service links.

5. Posts & schedules any special services requested by the client on the subscription page.

                                                                                                                                                 II. SUMMARY

1. WHAT WE DID!

a. BUILT A NEW, FRESH SECTOR FOR BUSINESS DIALOGUE ON THE WEB

WWWBS is the definitive community of active businesses on the web

It permits never before seen levels of differentiation for the active business community, sub communities and unique individual businesses. This permits business visibility and access as it was meant to be. This is: the only source for guaranteed accurate, clear, up to date and actionable information about today’s businesses.

b. BUILT THE INFRASTRUCTURE FOR THE FIRST DISTRIBUTED,NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL, CROSS INDUSTRY BUSINESS INFORMATION DATA BASE

CONTAINING BOTH UNIFORM DATA AND RICH MULTI MEDIA CONTENT THAT IS EASILY ACCESSED AND RATED FOR QUALITY.

c. BUILT A NEW AND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY THAT CREATES AND MAINTAINS YOUR DYNAMIC PRESENCE ON THE WEB.

(1)     Your real Business Identity Profile as simple or as complex as it may be.
(2)     Your active Visitor Dialogue Profile that provides the right information to the right people at the right time and is capable of selectively managing many your web based communication programs.
(a)   Marketing
(b)   Customer Relations
(c)    Public Relations
(d)   Employee Relations
(e)    Partner Relations
(f)     Stockholder Relations
(g)   Operations Outreach
(h)   E-Deal Sourcing

d. BUILT A BETTER SEARCH ENGINE

(1)     More criteria
(2)     Sector specific (ie business )
(3)     Integrated compound directoried
(4)     More connections

e. BUILT FLEET OF BUSINESS FOCUSED DIRECTORIES

(1)     BROADER CONTENT
(2)     BETTER ORGANIZED
(3)     BETTER MAINTAINED
(4)     BETTER CONTROLLED
(a)   Companies can add and remove themselves from appropriate directories as the opportunity arises.
(5)     NEW DIRECTORIES ON DEMAND

f. BUILT BETTER SITE VISITOR SERVICES

See Marketing Outline below